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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
agreement, a bigger deal, a grand bargain or whatever you want to call it, that solves the deficit problems in a balanced and responsible way that does not just deal with taxes but also spending so that we can put all this behind us and focus on growing our economy. with this congress, that was obviously too much to hope for at this time. [laughter] maybe we can do it in stages. we will solve this problem instead in several steps. in 2011, we started reducing the deficit through $1 trillion in spending cuts which have taken place. the agreement being worked on right now would further reduce the deficit by asking the wealthiest 2% of americans to pay higher taxes for the first time in two decades so that would add additional hundreds of billions of dollars to deficit reduction. that is progress but we will need to do more. keep in mind that just last month, republicans in congress of they would not agree to raise tax rates on the wealthiest americans and the agreement being discussed would raise those rates permanently. [applause] keep in mind, we will still have more work to do. we still ha
. federal deficits were .8%. that's .8% of gdp. now our trillion dollars federal deficit amounts to 7.3% of gdp. back then trade was aa contributor to economic growth for the, economy. reunion $500 million at $4.2 billion adjustedio for inflation, and we're running a trade deficit,it trade deficit $536 billion. $536 million. back then social security made up 6.5%. 6.5%. of the federal budget. 6.5%. the decayed and medicare didn't exist back then. let's compare that to what we are doing now. a 20% of the budget on social security, and then we throw a 21% more of the federal budget for medicare, medicaid, and another 13% for other social programs, food stamps. so that comes up to a whopping 54% of the budget. 54%. forgot to mention this. it is kind of important, isn't it? back than median family income was about $38,000. $38,000. today it is $62,000. we will pretend that looks like a two and that looks like a six. we haven't done too well, more than half a century in raising a the median income ine this country and that is something he is right about, we do have to fix that. imagine thi
and shrink our deficits. it's a balance plan. one that would protect the middle class, cut spending in a responsible way and ask the wealthiest americans to pay a little more. and i'll keep working with anybody who's serious about getting a comprehensive plan like this done because it's the right thing to do for our economic growth. but we're now at the point where in just a couple of days the law says that every american's tax rates are going up. every american's paycheck will get a lot smaller. and that would be the wrong thing to do for our economy. it would hurt middle class families and hurt the businesses that depend on your spending and congress can prevent it from happening, if they act now. leaders in congress are working on a way to prevent this tax hike on the middle class and i believe we may be able to reach an agreement that could pass both houses in time. >> the president will have another chance to deliver that message, again. this morning he will appear on nbc's "meet the press." his first sunday talk show appearance in three years. mr. obama is expected to call on
across the country. we talk about reducing deficits and having a responsible budget for 20 years. this is actually, it will you go over the cliff and nothing changes, the largest single day of the deficit reduction in world history. it is $600 billion in deficit reduction trust by the turn in the calendar. over the long term, you look at what that does, we are in much better shape over the long term by going off the cliff. the problem is that right now, we are still very slowly recovering from the worst financial crisis it had since the great depression. it probably is not the time to be having such large deficit reduction. that is why we and others have been focused on getting some kind of a larger deal that can ensure we do not have this extensive short-term deficit reduction. if we start to deal with these problems now, we can do so adequately and without too much short-term economic pain and helping the economy. from let's go to patricia oak creek, wisconsin on the democratic line. caller: good morning, and happy new year to the both of you. i feel so sad for our poor country
but the debate over the deficit and the debt that is behind this? >> well, if you go back to 2001 and thereafter, the cost of the war was not included in the budget except the military and the defense budget. but the additional costs were not reflected in the budget. there were always supplementals. so they didn't show as a deficit. a vendor ackley to the debt. so while the budgets were reasonable in that period of time, the actual spending didn't show in the budget and people didn't pay as much attention to the debt as they do today because it kept mounting and so we borrowed to pay for the war and in fact we didn't ask people to make sacrifices financially. >> there is a difference between borrowing in the future, paying for work and paying back words, we are having to pay right now. people might have felt differently if they had felt the pinch right at that time. we would have asked different questions and were asked, and i think that is one of the reasons we got where we are. and it's where we are. >> on appropriations could you have been any more vocal about it to provide us getting into t
with speaker pelosi, the twin deficit the job and the budget deficit. lori: we don't hear that. we have breaking news. urinalysis is a fascinating. deschutes your analysis is fascinating we want to have you back again. tracy: and 14 major ports that are being threatened to be shut down. we will get the latest. lori: also confidence in the global economy is higher suggesting people are picking up more security. we are back after this. she keeps you guessing. it's part of what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, ashis may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol
economic position, driving away tourists and investors, stopping growth and pushing up the state deficit. that israel has approved the construction of 940 new homes -- >> israel has approved the construction of 940 new homes on the outskirts of jerusalem. for palestinians, the land as part of east jerusalem, which would serve as the capital of a future state. they say settlements there violate international law, but israel says it is an integral part of jerusalem, which it sees as its own capital. israel has been pressing ahead with plans to expand settlements since the palestinians were granted observer status at the u.n. to russia has put in place the last section of an oil pipeline from eastern siberia to the pacific. that is a link up that is now almost 5,000 kilometers long. >> the massive project is russia's oil fields direct access to key markets in japan, south korea, taiwan, the philippines, and the usa. >> after six years of construction and around 21 billion euros, the pipeline is complete. russia hopes it will be able to expand sales into the u.s. market. it also wants to sel
, as well. now, the government has been running huge deficits for a while. >> i still find it fascinating looking at the basis of the actual market. given as you say we're about to enter a recession again. you brought a very, very divided and different government scenario which hopefully will be sorted out. but whether or not the japanese underperformance on the nikkei is going to continue, as well, given the comments we've had about the stimulus will flow into the economy. >> the japanese economy is still or at least the large companies are still very export oriented. if the yen depreciate appreciations, that should improve the chances for japanese companies to gain market share all over the world and that should improve earnings prospect, too, and drive up shares. i see that quite simplistic and there is upside if the yen really tanks. of course, we have to keep the currency movements in mind if you're an international investor, of course, examine japan, of course, has a domestic economy, too, which is likely to remain quite weak. that is the down side, as well. all other things being a
are going to push us that way because of the deficit issue. and the one thing i would like to add is, these choices of what systems to cut or what forces to cut would be far less difficult if we could make the defense department more efficient. and we identify in the study some $900 billion in potential savings just through greater efficiency, particularly in the way we utilize manpower. so if we could pocket that, then we wouldn't to have cut our combat forces as much. >> but let me ask you something that i've asked almost everybody in the administration. the administration is banking on huge savings from better buying power, reorganizing processes and becoming more efficient, but the trouble is what happens if the savings don't materialize? where are we going to get savings in that case? >> well, the hope is that the fiscal -- because of the fiscal pressures, the services and the congress will be more cooperative in actually implementing these savings. these efficiencies are not made up by academics like myself. these were recommended by official government study groups and like th
house released includes this paragraph. seek a bald approach for bringing down the deficit with $3 in cuts for every one dollars in tax reform that contributes to deficit reduction. they said this is consistent with the bipartisan commission approach. yes, he did say that and, yes, we don't have that and, yes, we are approaching this deadline. >> how do you negotiate with someone who said during the campaign over and over three dollars in cuts for are one dollar in revenue and now neither side is going to get everything that they want. but the house republicans have said okay, we'll find $800 billion in revenue but give us the $2.4 trillion in it cuts and he has not been willing to do that. so the last ditch effort the hail hary pass was the house of representatives saying fine let's take nancy pelosi and chuck schumer's bill that they proposed this summer to extend the tax rates on every household and every small business a million dollars and below, allow them to go up on the million dollars and above which is the current law on january 1, let's do that. that ought to be somethin
their deficit and we cannot, the world will switch to euros. there is a tweet here -- guest: the cbo is supposed to be a political, but it cannot be too alarmist. if we go over the cliff, we are looking on january 1, some of this is already milton. about $600 million -- $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases. that is about 4% of gdp. that is an enormous negative stimulus. a detraction from demand. that would surely be a deep recession. the cbo relies on simulation models that did not take into consideration investor sentiment, the reaction of consumers, and so forth that they wholly lose confidence in their government. if we go over the cliff and stay there, people will start to conclude that washington cannot manage its affairs. all bets are off on economic modeling. it is impossible to say what happened that other than it would be very negative. host: one piece that you actually did right has this headline -- take the idea of a recession next year. with the perspective of everything else going on, when a recession look like? guest: it depends on how we get there. if we have a fiscal c
affected. again, they've already given $103 billion toward deficit reduction and almost every scenario that we've considered a likelihood federal employees get hit again. >> ifill: let me ask you each briefly. are you optimistic or pessimistic from what you read about the prospect of a deal? >> i'm very optimistic. i think they will do something to avert sequestration, yes. >> ifill: hugh johnson? >> very clearly i think that the message of the markets is we're going to avoid a significant tax increase and significant spending cuts or the economy is not going to go into a recession in 2013 and that's really the key in this whole thing. or, i would add, 2014. so i'm cautiously optimistic. i'm holding on to my -- i'm crossing my fingers and holding on for dear life. >> ifill: crossing your fingers and toes? stacy palmer? >> i hope we'll some kind to an agreement soon but whatever happen there ises is s going to be deficit cutting and we'll have to face decisions so that could be rough. >> ifill: stacy palmer, jacque simon and hugh johnson of johnson illington advisories, i wanted to get
insurance is still available for 2 million people, and that lays the groundwork then for additional deficit reduction and economic growth steps that we can take in the new year. >> all of this still developing. and we will have more on all of it with mark shields and david brooks later in the program. >> also ahead >> warner: also ahead, between now and then; protesting a gang rape in india; mass producing high quality education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get
and only talking about taxes which will do nothing to decrease the deficit. >> juliet: thank you for joining us and waking up at the bright and early hour of 6:10 a.m. >> clayton: thanks, curtis. let's check with maria molina, another snowstorm in ohio and east and some places in southern new england got up to a foot of snow. >> dave: and drivers be warned, five people hurt in new hampshire after a 20-car pileup and some airports saw slays and a plane taken off in sheing slid off the runway, and stuck in a snow bank, 6 6 on board. no one was hurt. >> juliet: for more on the conditions as mr. clayton morris said, maria molina. i was saddened not to see a white new years, pre-new years. >> we didn't see it accumulate in new york, in manhattan. outside, hoboken saw snow on the cars, but not on the ground or the streets, but place ins connecticut and massachusetts actually saw close to a foot of snow. i even sawmill ford, massachusetts over a foot of snow and some people did get lucky and needed snow across portions of we haven't is that much snow so far this winter. it's early in t
news is i don't think it many will have meaningful deficit reduction. i think this is just going to keep dragging on and on. >> in your book, you advocate for raising the capital gains tax, which could make wall street owe a lot more money than it does now. >> yes. right. >> that's discussed as part of a fiscal cliff deal, but many believe that will end up hurting the economy, giving a disincentive to invest money? was that just focused on the real wealthy? >> i hear that argument a lot. number one is, i'm really tired of our tax policy decisions. you know, everything, being made by what the market's going to do in the next quarter. this is about aberration of the tax code and grossly unfair. say they raise top tax rate to 39.6% for those making more than $500,000. that means a lot of small businesses will are paying that nearly 40% marginal tax rate where you have billionaire private equity funds paying 15, 20, even 24, depending where they put it. it's not an issue of penalizing investment income. it's an issue of penalizing labor, and those who make their income through wages.
of the new tax regime that comes out of it and it will help the deficit. i am speaking anathema but that is certainty. shibani: 70 -- dennis: something wins and the economy could make stocks right at some point. thank you very much, jim laventhol. here's one retail segment that did great. gun, rifle and ammunition sales are skyrocketing following the backlash against guns at the connecticut elementary school. the world's largest supplier of firearms says it sold 3.5 years worth of ammunition clips for automatic weapons in just three days and a gun shop owner north carolina says gun sales for christmas or four times better than last year. many customers blame talk of stricter gun control for driving the rush. unintended consequences. let's look at gun stocks. the images that so smith and wesson, they are down. the middle of their sales are probably up. shibani: one of the most profitable industries out. 20% profit margins for gun sales. dennis: computer hardwaremakers 5%. shibani: on a business base is a lot of people trying to cash in because they're worried about stricter gun c
for the holidays. the president's aides tell us in private he scaled back from a $4 trillion deficit deal. he wants something smaller in the wake of speaker john boehner's failure on so-called plan b last week. they just want something that will extend middle class tax cuts. they want to see two million people get unemployment benefits extended. those are running out at end of the year by the way the president, you remember, came out on friday after speaker boehner talked about the failure of the vote thursday night and president basically said everyone should calm down, cool off over the holidays. take a listen. >> everybody can cool off. everybody can drink some eggnog, have some christmas cookies, sing some christmas carols, enjoy the company of loved ones and then i would ask every member of congress while they're back home to think about that. think about the obligations we have to the people who sent us here. >> reporter: so, sing some carols today. probably will be some eggnog. here in hawaii, maybe back in ohio where john boehner is likely celebrating the holidays as well but they have got
deficit reduction. democrats say that could come later, but this would be a smaller plan. there are really some serious differences and not a lot of time left. congress has created its own deadline to this so-called fiscal cliff and now has to live by it over the next several hours to see if something can get done. erica? >> kelly o'donnell, thank you. chuck todd is nbc's political director. kelly mentioned some constructive movement but then there's this chasm we keep hearing about. is there a chance for a deal? >> i think -- i want to say yes, there's a chance for a deal! they're not that far apart. it really depends on the political motivations of the people at the negotiating table. you think about joe biden and mitch mcconnell, mitch mcconnell is totally looking at this through a political lens, what is in the best interest of republicans in his view? from what i understand in his view he thinks what's in the best interest of the republican party is getting the tax issue off the table and then having a big knockdown, drag-down fight with the president in six weeks over the debt ceilin
that getting the debt and deficit under control is in the interests of younger generations so they are not saddled with debt solely for our current consumption. but how we get there matters an awful lot. if you raise taxes on people at the top, that affects people mostly in their peak earning year, late 40s to their late 50s. if you focus the spending cuts on discretionary spending which is what we've done so far, you squeeze investment thes in the next generation. education, infrastructure, research. there really needs to be a balance both between taxes and spending and then on the spending side between restraining discretionary spending and restraining entitlements which are aimed at today's seniors. >> so many times we've heard talk about generational warfare between old and young. but this is a little bit different. >> right. first of all, there is no -- today there is generational warfare more in the opposite direction. the polls show that young people by and large are willing to pay for entitlements for today's seniors. what's eroded is the willingness of today's senior
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)